NCLUDE 4.16.21 The impact of Indian boarding schools on family relationships Session 2

Office of Diversity and Inclusion Author
04/19/2021 Added
9 Plays

Description

Hello All, Welcome back to our second session. I am Charlie Foster (Assistant Vice Chancellor for Inclusive Student Excellence and the Director of OASIS) and I am happy to introduce our speakers. Dr. Melissa D. Zephier Olson is a Yankton Sioux tribal member and a descendant of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara tribes. She holds a master’s degree in Marriage and Family Therapy where she gained a deeper understanding of better engaging culturally diverse individuals and families into therapy. She received her PhD in Human Sciences- Specialization in Global Family Health and Wellbeing from the Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies and is a new alum of UNL. She is a published author and has presented at numerous national and international on minority health disparities, Indigenous studies, and behavioral counseling for culturally diverse populations. She had the extreme honor of building strong and collaborative research partnerships with many Northern Plains Tribe Knowledge Sharers in exploring Indigenous family relationships. Ted Hibbeler is a member of the Iron Shell family (Maza Pon Kesh Ka Tiospaye) from the Rosebud Sioux Nation (Sicangu Lakota Oyate) in South Dakota. He was raised in Hastings, Nebraska and graduated from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln with a B.Sc. in Education. He spent 10 years teaching and coaching high school students at St. Francis Indian School in South Dakota. Ted earned a MA in Teaching English from Hastings College. He has worked as the Director of Native American Education for the Phoenix Union High School District (PUHSD) for the last twenty years. He earned a Master of Education in Educational Administration and Supervision Degree from Arizona State University. Ted moved back to Nebraska in 2020 and is currently the Tribal Extension Educator for the Extension Division at UNL. This session is over the impact of Indian boarding schools on family relationships.


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